Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Do You Have 2020 Vision? By Marie Wells Coutu


Our eyesight is precious.

I’m writing this two days after having surgery on my right eye, and it’s given me a new appreciation for how much we rely on vision. An air bubble from the surgery is hanging around the bottom half of the eye, providing a weird darkish circle that affects everything I look at. (No worries; they tell me it will dissolve in a few days)

But this dark circle brings to mind the Apostle Paul’s comment:

For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known (1 Corinthians 13:12).

Other versions translate the first part as seeing “through a dim window obscurely” or “a blurred image in a mirror.” We view our circumstances with human, flawed eyesight. We look at the trials and tribulations that have come our way this year, and we wonder at the irony: 2020 has given us anything but “2020” perfection.

And yet, God reminds us that He is in control.


One day, we will be able to see as He sees, to know as He knows, and we will understand how the things we went through were all part of His plan.

Recently a friend shared a series of photographs on Facebook created by Spanish artist Paloma Rincon. Each picture shows an ordinary object like a banana or a carrot looking into a mirror. The reflection in each case is flawed. The firm, yellow banana sees an overripe, wrinkled, rotten piece of fruit in the mirror.

The artist commented, “How many times do we look at the mirror and don’t appreciate what we see in the reflection? How young and perfect do we want to be? For how long? This beautiful banana is at its best point in life and just gets a distorted reflection of itself, perceiving an old banana instead of what she is.” (Look for Paloma Rincon’s Mental Health series on Facebook or Instagram)

Whether we’re looking at ourselves or our circumstances, our perspective is distorted by what we think we see. But we can look forward to the day when our blinders are removed and we see God face to face. 

As Christian writers, our job is to focus on God and what He sees. While we don’t yet have His full, clear vision, we can tell stories that reveal the little that we do understand. Our writing can help readers see themselves and the world from God’s perspective.

We look at the trials and tribulations that have come our way this year, and we wonder at the irony: 2020 has given us anything but “2020” perfection. @mwcoutu @MaryAFelkins #2020vision #SeriouslyWrite

As Christian writers, our job is to focus on God and what He sees. Our writing can help readers see themselves and the world from God’s perspective. @mwcoutu @MaryAFelkins #2020vision #SeriouslyWrite

Marie Wells Coutu finds beauty in surprising places, like old houses, gnarly trees, and forgotten treasures. When she’s not writing about finding restoration and healing through God-designed journeys, she enjoys taking broken things and making them useful. She is currently working on historical romance novels set in the 1930s. One manuscript won the 2019 Touched by Love Contest and the 2019 Sheila Contest, and a second novel also won in the Sheila Contest. Her published novels are women’s contemporary fiction. Her debut novel, For Such a Moment, won the Books of Hope Contest. The Secret Heart, her newest release, and Thirsting for More, the second book in the series, were finalists in several contests.

You can find more about Marie and her novels on her Facebook author page and her website, MarieWellsCoutu.com. Follow her on Twitter @mwcoutu or on Amazon.

3 comments:

  1. Amen. Focus on God. We don't need to know all the answers to life's questions. We need to place our trust and faith in Him. :-)

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  2. I just has a similar conversation with one of my daughters regarding the way we view ourselves. If not through the lens of truth and what the Lord sees, then we are left to our own interpretation which is rarely accurate. Our characters don't see themselves accurately, either. It's up to us to give them proper vision in hopes our readers will benefit. Thanks for a terrific post, Marie!

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  3. 1 Corinthians 13:12 has always been the one verse that I had trouble understanding...until now. Thank you for this wonderful article.

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