Thursday, August 3, 2017

Bad Scores = Good Lessons by Susan Tuttle


How many of you have entered contests over the years? And how many of you have received less than stellar scores? Yep. Me too😃

I used to cringe when I would see my scores return. I even reached a point where I didn’t want to open the email. Sometimes it would have been less painful to shove bamboo shoots under my fingernails.

But I learned something. Those bad scores came with great feedback. Concrete ways that I could grow and change my writing. They also thickened my sensitive skin—something that must happen if you want to be a writer. This is a world of rejection; it doesn’t matter if you’re published or not. There will always be people who don’t like what you write…and that’s okay! You begin to develop an ear for what criticisms to listen to, and what ones you release.

So I encourage you to keep entering contests. Keep growing. Keep thickening your skin. It’s all part of becoming the writer you’re meant to be! And there is (almost) always good to be found tucked into the bad.


Susan L. Tuttle lives in Michigan where she’s happily married to her best friend and is a homeschooling mom of three. She’s firmly convinced that letters were meant for words, not math, and loves stringing them together into stories that inspire, encourage, and grow women into who God created them to be. Romance, laughter, and cookies are three of her favorite things, though not always in that order. You can connect with Susan at her blog, Steps, Facebook, or Twitter.



6 comments:

  1. Susan, Amen to what you said about using the feedback from contests to make our writing better. I always entered the contests to get the feedback, not to win. I believe I'm published today because I listened to the feedback from judges and critique partners. I may not have used their exact suggestions, but, if something in my story stopped them, I needed to look for a better way of saying that something. Thanks for reminding us that what seems to be bad feedback is often exactly what we need to go forward.

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    1. And yes to all YOU said! I think learning how to listen to constructive criticism while maintaining our voice is one of the hardest--but best--things we can learn as a writer!

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  2. Because they can come back all over the place, you have to keep those scores and the feedback in perspective. But I'm with you, Susan. They can be invaluable!

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    1. Exactly!! It's learning to compare them and mine out the gold that's important. It's another skill we need to acquire.

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  3. Thank you for this encouragement about entering contests. I appreciate your wisdom. :-)

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    1. You're welcome, Melissa! Blessings to you today!

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