Thursday, June 22, 2017

Do You Remember Your First Story Idea by Terri Weldon

I still remember the idea for my first book. My creative mind had been soaking up every word of the contemporary Christian romances I had started reading. Then suddenly I devised a story idea. It was over the top, gut wrenching, and filled with angst. A daughter abandoned by her prostitute mother is determined to confront the woman she hates, the woman she blames for everything wrong in her life. When she lands on her mother’s door step, it’s too late. She learns her mother has died.

Time for total honesty here – I still like the storyline! At the time I wrote the book the plot was too difficult for me. The book needed a more experienced author. Trust me there was much more to the storyline than I told you above. 

I waited a few years. I even penned my first book, which resides in a drawer in an old filing cabinet. Then Love Inspired Romance advertised a contest. All I had to do was send in my completed manuscript, and if I won, I could become a published author. Oh, hope springs eternal. As fast as possible I penned the entire book and carted it down to my local post office. When the winner of the contest was announced, her name wasn’t Terri Weldon. 

Even after that I didn’t give up. I probably didn’t write as much as I should have and I let too much time elapse, but I didn’t throw in the towel. Even today I’m still plugging along. Sometimes I miss the young woman who wrote that novel with such confidence.  In my heart I knew I was destined to be published and I believed it would happen. And it did, but not for many many years and not with that book. 

Still, no matter how many new story ideas I come up with, I don’t think any of them will ever replace the excitement I felt when I devised the first one. 

What about you? What was your first story idea? I’d love to hear all about it. 


Ellie Alexander is in love. And the only thing sweeter would be if Libby, Natalie, and Stephanie, her three unmarried, unattached granddaughters, could find the same happiness. Maybe with a little help from her and her beau Blake Parker . . .

A Match Made in Williamstown by Lady of Love Inspired Romance Jean C. Gordon — Libby Schuyler has avoided dating since her break-up with college-sweetheart Jack Parker. Out of nowhere, Jack shows up claiming Ellie is swindling his grandfather, Blake, through a travel agency partnership they’ve formed. Libby and Jack team up to protect their grandparents and get to the bottom of Ellie and Blake’s business and romantic relationship. While Libby and Jack fight their reignited attraction, Ellie and Blake conspire to bring the two together.

A Match Made in Sheffield by Terri Weldon— Natalie Benton bounced from one foster home to another until she landed on Ellie Alexander’s doorstep. Natalie’s vagabond childhood caused her to yearn for a secure life, which led to Natalie’s five-year plan: complete her law degree, marry the perfect man, become a partner at Montgomery, Haynes, and Preston, and produce one child. Getting arrested wasn’t in Natalie’s plan. Needing a public defender wasn’t in her plan. Falling for Grady Hunter, her public defender, definitely wasn’t in her plan. Can Grady convince Natalie there is more to life than her five-year plan? Is Ellie the only one who sees a future for Natalie and Grady?

A Match Made in Freedom by Lisa Belcastro — Stephanie Gould loves life on Martha’s Vineyard . . . until she runs into Kay and Tim, her former business partner and her ex-fiancĂ©, who just returned from their honeymoon. Surprised by the heartache she thought was gone, Stephanie heads to the Berkshires to visit family and friends. Arriving in Stockbridge, Stephanie meets Captain Henry Lewis. Little does Stephanie know, her grandmother has already met Henry, and Ellie thinks Henry is perfect. Stephanie has no interest in dating, Henry included. If only Henry didn’t turn up everywhere Stephanie goes. When he walks up beside her at the Norman Rockwell Museum, Stephanie can’t deny her attraction, but she’ll do her best to fight it.

Buy Links

Amazon Kindle & Print: http://amzn.to/2pb4HuK 
Nook, iBooks & Kobo: https://www.books2read.com/u/3neJnB
Barnes & Noble Print: http://bit.ly/2qbmqEtMatchmakers  

Terri Weldon is a lead analyst by day and an author by night. She enjoys gardening, reading, and shopping for shoes. One of her favorite pastimes is volunteering as the librarian at her church. It allows her to shop for books and spend someone else’s money! Plus, she has the great joy of introducing people to Christian fiction. She lives with her family in Oklahoma. Terri has two adorable Westies – Crosby and Nolly Grace. She is a member of ACFW and OCFW, a local chapter of ACFW. Terri is the award winning author of The Christmas Bride Wore Boots.

Readers can connect with Terri: Website: www.TerriWeldon.com or Blog: Seriously Write
 

16 comments:

  1. Hi Terri, I was 9 and had this great cowboy story idea. I wrote the story and took the paragraph to my dad. He didn't gush as I'd hoped. I was disappointed, but I had a lot of partial manuscripts stored under my bed for a long time as a young adult. Agent Chip MacGregor said it takes 4 completed manuscripts to learn to write and the fourth is most likely to get published. That was true for me.

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    1. Hi Zoe! As a reader I wanted to tell you I still love a cowboy hero.

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    2. Zoe, I can't believe your dad didn't gush over the story! You were so creative at such a young age. That's wonderful. I totally agree with Loves To Read, I love a cowboy hero.

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  2. Hi Terri - I'm really not a writer - just a reader - but I did attempt one book many, many years ago. Oh my - it was so over the top on emotion and dialogue but it was such fun to write. I sent it straight to the Harlequin office and waited - confident it would be accepted and published. It didn't happen but it's a fun memory and I love reading other people's efforts. Christian fiction is one of my favorites!

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    1. Loves to Read - that's awesome that you wrote a book! I wish you'd give it another try. So, did writing a book impact how you view a book when reading?

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    2. It did! I find myself wondering why authors have characters do and say certain things more than I would if I hadn't tried writing!

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  3. All I remember about my first book idea was that the hero was a high school science teacher with a ponytail and the story started with the heroine breaking up with her then-current boyfriend. After, I trashed that idea, I did sell my next, Bachelor Father, as sweet romance, to Avalon Books.

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    1. Okay Jean, I'll confess, I would have loved your hero with the ponytail! The book sounds fun and I'm so impressed you sold with book number two.

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  4. Oh Terri what a great post! I think your idea is fascinating. My first idea was actually for a YA because I was in my late teens. I can't even remember the gist of it, but the title was Three Cheers for Me. I'm thinking it was a young girl seeking her independence but I really can't remember. This is a fun discussion :)

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    1. Thanks Christina! I'm glad you enjoyed the post. A YA sounds like such fun. Don't you think when we first start writing we tend to write about the age we are?

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  5. My first story idea was sparked when I sat next to a guy on an airplane. He wasn't famous, but he was related to someone who was a semi-famous (at the time) politician. I remember thinking that an airplane was a great place to put two together people from very different worlds. The story started there--a famous man meets an ordinary woman. I obsessed over that story for years before I ever wrote it down. By then, it was an epic tale that ended up being about 700 pages. Needless to say, that manuscript has never seen the light of day, but it began my obsession with storytelling, and I've been writing ever since.

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    1. So real life drew you into the writing life. I like that! Obviously it's where you were meant to be.

      I think you should let me read that book someday.

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  6. Love that story idea, Terri! The first novel I wrote was women's fiction, but included romance. It was about an elementary teacher who suspected one of her students was being sexually abused at home. She also had to confront her own abuse as a child. A few friends felt that it would be too difficult to read emotionally. I haven't looked at it for years - but it would be interesting to go back and read it now.

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    1. Dawn, it sounds like a great idea. Plus I think readers are more receptive to reading about the ugly things that happen in life than they used to be.

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  7. Fun blog, Terri! Years and years before I ever worked up the courage to actually submit something, I wrote a very emotional story about an ice skater and a hero who was strikingly similar to Robby Benson in Ice Castles. It was great fun at the time. :)

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    1. Connie, I love that idea and I used to think Robby Benson was a dreamboat! Fun memories, I'm so glad you shared.

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