Friday, October 3, 2014

Why Book #2 Is Harder by Sarah Loudin Thomas


Sarah Loudin Thomas

After pouring ourselves into writing our first book and striving to make it as close to perfection as we can, starting the process all over can feel overwhelming and even a bit frightening. Sarah Loudin Thomas shares her experience and offers encouragement. ~ Dawn


Why Book #2 Is Harder

 Miracle in a Dry Season has been out for two months now. Which means I’m practically a veteran author, right? Ha!

Having a novel in print is both wonderful and terrifying. People have been reading and reviewing the book, which has been exciting. It's SO satisfying to see readers comment on the very themes I hoped were somewhere in those pages between the pretty covers. Because in storytelling, there comes a point when I've written, edited, re-edited, and combed through the words to the point that I'm not sure what's in there anymore.

Which is why it was so hard to let go of the sequel—Until the Harvest. I'd written it, completed the major edits, and right after the release of book #1, it was time to send it back to my editor for another thorough going over. And I didn't want to let go.

I kept wondering if the story communicates what I hope it does. Did I get the message in there? Will readers love the new characters as much as the old ones? Am I letting them down in some way by moving on? Having gotten some feedback on book #1, I now have an idea about what's appealing to readers. Do I still have that in book #2?

I had not anticipated these doubts. It made me really, really glad I'd already written Until the Harvest. If I were just jumping in, I'd be much too heavily influenced by what I think readers want instead of what God has called me to write.

And there's the hard part. It's not about me. I've grown the best book I can from the seed God planted in my heart. I've nurtured and watered and pruned (oh, how I've pruned!). And those glorious lines that might capture people's hearts? If there are any, they're the ones God whispered in my ear. At this point, trying to come up with anything else on my own would be foolish.

So I pried my fingers off the digital pages of Until the Harvest and hit send. I'd say I gave it to God except that it's always been His. He's just been letting me hold it for a while. And that is more than enough for me.



Tweetables:

I've grown the best book I can from the seed God planted in my heart. Click to tweet.

Those glorious lines that might capture people's hearts? If there are any, they're the ones God whispered in my ear. Click to tweet.

I'd say I gave it to God except that it's always been His. He's just been letting me hold it for a while. And that is more than enough for me. Click to tweet.

On October 4, the e-book of Miracle in a Dry Season by Sarah Loudin Thomas will go on sale for $1.99. Readers can find at any major retailer. Click to tweet.





It’s 1954 and Perla Long’s arrival in the sleepy town of Wise, West Virginia, was supposed to go unnoticed. She just wants a quiet, safe place for her and her daughter, Sadie, where the mistakes of her past can stay hidden. But then drought comes to Wise, and Perla is pulled into the turmoil of a town desperately in need of a miracle.

Casewell Phillips has resigned himself to life as a bachelor…until he meets Perla. She’s everything he’s sought in a woman, but he can’t get past the sense that she’s hiding something. As the drought worsens, Perla’s unique gift divides the town in two, bringing both gratitude and condemnation, and placing the pair in the middle of a storm of anger and forgiveness, fear and faith.


“Once in a while a new author comes along with a work that makes you sit up and take notice. Thomas has crafted a tale of this proportion.” – Library Journal starred review


On October 4, the e-book of Miracle in a Dry Season will go on sale for $1.99. Readers can find a link to it here: http://bakerpublishinggroup.com/bethanyhouse/ebook-specials-from-bethany-house  or at any major retailer.



Sarah Loudin Thomas grew up on a 100-acre farm in French Creek, WV, the seventh generation to live there. Her Christian fiction is set in West Virginia and celebrates the people, the land, and the heritage of Appalachia. Sarah currently oversees fundraising and communications for a Christian children’s home in Black Mountain, NC. She and her husband Jim live in the mountains of Western North Carolina with Thistle–the canine equivalent to a personal trainer pushing them to hike, run, and throw sticks. Sarah is active in her local church and enjoys cooking and–you guessed it–reading.

To learn more and connect with Sarah, please visit:

@SarahAnneThomas 



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