Thursday, August 14, 2014

Rejection by Terri Weldon

Terri Weldon
An author’s life is tough. We plot, work, and pour our hearts out onto the page. Still, we often face the sting of rejection. I’ll tell you something that I’d flat prefer to keep to myself. I’ve been rejected more times this year than any other in my writing journey.

I’ve heard many authors say you get used to it or you develop a tough skin. Both of those statements are true – in a sense. Don’t get me wrong, I had my pity party after every rejection. Each time I gave myself the usual pep talk, listened to friends as they tried to boost my morale, and forged ahead to the next project. However, one “thanks, but no thanks” hit me particularly hard. My pity party lasted a little longer than normal and it took an entire afternoon off work commiserating with friends to move forward. Not to mention all the conversations I put my longsuffering sister through. Thankfully I have a great support system, which for an author, is invaluable.

I’ve given up the pity party circuit (I hope) and now I’m working on honing my craft. Looking at the invaluable feedback I received from editors and trying to make sure I don’t make those same mistakes again. Will I succeed? I hope so, but I’m sure I’ll have my relapses. And I’m sure the good Lord had a reason I’ve walked this path. Part of it I’m beginning to understand and part of it I may never understand. That part I’ll just take on faith, because regardless of how I feel, when or what I understand, His ways are far better than my ways.

Rejection is part of the journey. The hard part. I may not like it, but I can accept it. Still, I could use a leg up, so how about sharing with me. Have you ever been rejected? If not, I applaud you. If so, how did you handle it?
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Purchase Link
Misty Winslow is determined to find her prince, and she meets the man of her dreams through an Internet dating service. Or is he, because the new dentist in town also sets her heart aflutter.

It's love at first sight for Tyler Davenport, but before he can finish his first root canal, Misty is involved in an exclusive online romance with Wes99—Tyler’s online persona. How can he tell her he’s the man she’s been waiting to meet, and how rational is it for him to be jealous of Wes99! Soon Tyler's pulling out all the stops to woo Misty.

As Christmas approaches, Wes99 and Tyler both ask her to meet them under the mistletoe. Which man will she choose?

Terri is a lead analyst by day and an author by night. She enjoys gardening, reading, and playing in the hand bell choir. One of her favorite pastimes is volunteering as the librarian at her church. It allows her to shop for books and spend someone else’s money! Plus, she has the great joy of introducing people to Christian fiction.
She lives with her family in Oklahoma. Terri has three dogs – a lovable mutt and two adorable Westies.

Terri is a member of ACFW and OCFW, a local chapter of ACFW. Her dream of becoming a published novelist came true in November 2013 when Mistletoe Magic, released from White Rose Publishing. To learn more about Terri visit her website at www.TerriWeldon.com.

24 comments:

  1. Have I been rejected? Ha!

    If I receive a good many rejections on a story I like, I get frustrated. However, my novella came as a result of one of those rejections you talked about, the one that really hits hard. I was so frustrated by it and another project that I decided to change gears and move on. The rest is history. :)

    Thanks, Terri!

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    1. Sandy, great advice! I need to get moving on another project. Congrats on your novella!

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  2. When I went skiing with my family as a kid, my father always used to tell us at the start of the day, "If you don't fall, you're not trying hard enough." And at the end of a day on the slopes, he'd say, "How many times did you fall?"

    Writers who've never been rejected aren't trying hard enough. They're not reaching for newer heights or trying new things.

    I've had some rejection this year, not in the form of actual rejection letters, but in the form of...let's call it unexpected reactions to my work. And I have to admit, I didn't handle it very well. I got angry. But now that I'm past that, I'm moving on. I'll keep editing that book, but it's time to start the next. I believe the best way to become a great writer is to write. A lot. So it's time for me to start my next project. And it'll be rejected, too, by somebody. And I'll probably get angry or have a little pity party all over again. Ah, the writing life...

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    1. Robin - I'm proud to say I've fallen a lot this year. :-)

      But you're right, it is the writing life. Now I just need to get started on that next project.

      As someone who has had the privilege of reading your work, I can honestly say your time is coming.

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  3. Terri, your "commiserating" friends are waiting, impatiently for God's plan in your writing. When it comes, it's gonna be AWESOME!! Hang in there!

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    1. I'd be lost without you guys! Everyone needs their commiserating friends.

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  4. Hi Terri, sending a big cyber hug. Well, the story that got rejected just might be perfect for another publishing house. You will find a home that's comfortable, I promise! Best wishes to you!

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  5. Thanks, Tanya. That would be awesome.

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  6. Rejected? Oh yeah. More times than I can remember. Keep your chin up, Terri. Throw a pity party, and then dig back in! You can do it!! xxoo

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    1. My mom used to say that it is fine to have a pity party, just don't stay on the pity pot too long. So, I'm studying some craft books to make sure I understand my mistakes. Hopefully my next project will lead to a sale.

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  7. Rejection just stinks. We all encounter it in life but it's never easy. Thanks for the advice on how to move on!

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  8. Your welcome, Loves To Read. Glad you enjoyed the post!

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  9. Definitely have had repeated rejection, and still do. And I usually wallow for a while. But I do try to limit it to a one-day pity party. :)

    The best advice anyone gave me is that it's just business, not anything personal (even when we sometimes feel like our stories are our children). That has helped me. Plus, I'm just stubborn. :) I keep trying again, and keep reading and trying to improve.

    Robin, I love your father's quote!

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  10. Stubborn helps in this business. And you are right, it is a business. I can't imagine you getting rejections!

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  11. Oh, yes, I've been rejected. And I'm sure it will happen again. I know it's part of this business, but it's certainly not the fun part. :) But you are a wonderful writer and I know it's all going to open up for you one of these days. And you'll be able to tell someone else, "Oh, yes, I've been rejected." :) Always remember, you have lots of company, and just keep going--like you are doing. You know we're all here to cheer you on! :)

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    1. Definitely not the fun part. LOL. I hope someday to be the encouragement to others that you guys are to me.

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  12. Nice post, Terri, because this is an important topic that all writers face.

    It helps me to think of rejection as redirection. It's painful, but it brings about changes either in the current manuscript or the next one, and that seems to lead me to better writing and closer understanding of who I am and what I need to keep pursuing. I think when we look back and see our improvements, it makes it all worthwhile.

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    1. Erin - that's a great way to look at it - redirection. I've been redirected and my goal now is to do all I can not to detour again.

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  13. Great post, Terri (And, hello, from an Okie pal :)). I have most definitely been rejected. Depending on the rejection, I handle them different ways, but I always remind myself that mega successful authors like Stephen King have been rejected. And, if it's good enough for him, it's good enough for me!

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    1. I love my Okie visitors! Great point about Stephen King, because his perseverance certainly paid off.

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  14. Oh yes, and Mistletoe Magic sounds fantastic! Congrats!

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  15. Hey Terri! I can so relate!! All I can say is don't give up. You never who will be that one person who loves your writing and your story.
    I have 2 examples. My Golden Heart finalist story was rejected twice by Love Inspired. Then on a whim I entered a one page contest and a different editor with LI LOVED it! It's now being released in February by Love Inspired!
    The other is my Irish Historical. It had several elements agents and editors wouldn't touch with a 10 ft pole. But Dave at Bethany House loved it! So you never know!
    It never hurts to hone your skills and try something new, but don't throw away your other stories. You never know when a bit of polish will reveal a gem!!

    Cheers,
    Sue

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  16. First, let me say I'm so excited about your upcoming releases. Not to mention your just released novel, Betrayed Hearts. I'm actually revising a manuscript to take to ACFW. Hopefully it will get some nibbles.

    And there is no way I'm getting rid of rejected manuscripts. Even if no one but me and my critique partners ever read them.

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