Monday, April 7, 2014

Researching for Novellas by Lenora Worth


Lenora Worth

Hey writers, Annette here. Ever notice how no mater the length of your writing project, there aren't any short cuts when it comes to research? Read on to see veteran author Lenora Worth's advice. Enjoy!

Researching for Novellas
by Lenora Worth

Research is a very important part of writing, even when you are writing a short story. Maybe even more so because you have to write tight and get to the basics right away. And even when you are writing a light-hearted story, research can bring the story alive and make readers feel as if they can relate to the emotions and even the setting in a story. Whether it’s a light sprinkling or a detailed procedural, research adds richness to the stories we write. My rule for research—research more than you’ll ever need but use exactly what you will need!

I am very happy to be a part of the twelve book novella series “A Year of Weddings,” from HarperCollins Christian Publishing and Zondervan.

My story is An April Bride, and I enjoyed writing about Marshall and Stella and their journey to the altar. The groom, Marshall Henderson, is an injured soldier. His distance and refusal to allow Stella to visit him while he’s in a military hospital causes her to have doubts about their relationship. But Marshall insists that she not cancel their April wedding. When he returns home one month before the wedding date, he confesses to Stella that he’s having memory problems. Stella tries to help him remember her and how they fell in love. Marshall must face his worst fears before he can marry the woman he still loves.

This story started out lighthearted and joyful but the subject matter of post-traumatic stress syndrome certainly isn’t light-hearted. While the short length and quick time span didn’t allow me to delve too deeply into this very serious disorder, I certainly researched it heavily and learned just how devastating it can be for injured warriors returning from war.

I hope readers will understand some of the challenges both Marshall and Stella had to face. And I hope they like this story. I am honored to be a part of “A Year of Weddings.”

~~~~~


An April Bride
Lenora Worth has written over fifty-five books for four different publishers. Her first Love Inspired, The Wedding Quilt, won Affaire de Coeur’s Best Inspirational for 1997, and Logan’s Child won Romantic Time’s Best Love Inspired for 1998. Three of her books have finaled in the American Christian Fiction Writers Carol Award and her Love Inspired Suspense, Body of Evidence, made the New York Times Bestseller list in Mass Market Paperbacks. With millions of books in print, Lenora continues to write romance and suspense for several imprints. Lenora also wrote a weekly opinion column for the local newspaper and worked freelance for a local magazine. She now enjoys full-time fiction writing and going on adventures with her retired husband, Don. Married for thirty-eight years, they have two grown children. Lenora enjoys writing, reading, baking, and shopping … especially shoe shopping.

4 comments:

  1. You're novella sounds really interesting. I've written a novel (a LONG) novel about a morphine-addicted Civil War soldier who hides his addiction for 700 pages! I LOVE long stories, but I agree with you that doing tons of research even if you only use a tiny fraction of it adds so much to the story--it's also tremendously fun.

    My question is how is writing a book for a Christian publisher different than just trying to sell your book (maybe with Christian themes) to a regular publisher and audience?

    Thanks!
    Adrienne Morris

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good question, Adrienne. There isn't so much of a difference except one very important one. Christian fiction always carries a faith filled theme through the book. I know many Christians who write secular fiction and the theme is there in a very subtle way. I know many Christians who choose to write for the Christian market only and that same theme shows up in their books. I say write the book of your heart but keep in mind that it might take a while to place it in a good publishing home! Thanks for your comment :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like that advice of research more than you'll ever need but only use what you need. No one wants to read a technical tome or text book. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I agree, Sandra. I write love stories not procedurals :) Or as I tell my husband, I know just enough to be dangerous! :)

    ReplyDelete

We'd love to hear your thoughts! Please leave comments. We'll moderate and post them!